Ahead of the Curve: Why Web Developers Like 'Dot-Codes'

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The tech industry is exploding in more ways than a "Fast and the Furious"movie, but in an oh-so good way. A result of this explosion (and subsequent demand for skilled workers to continue driving this digital momentum), the tech boom has produced a red-hot industry with strong appeal for those who grew up with the Internet: coding. "Coders" are the people who engineer the programs and platforms that've revolutionized human interaction in recent decades. They're building everything from the touch screen flicks of Angry Birds to the underlying coding platform that runs Internet juggernauts such as Google and Netflix. In fact, "web developer" ranked No. 3 for best technology job, according to a recent U.S. News & World Report survey. But with more than 18 million software developers in the world, it can be difficult to stand out in this accelerating industry.

An online presence is a minimum requirement, so most coders have a website to promote their services and overall brand. However, this is also a community that has a way of staying ahead of the (digital) curve, even down to the URL they choose to promote their work and services. To that point, a growing number are leaving behind the domain suffixes of the CD-rom era and choosing one more befitting for the digital and cloud age: 'dot-codes' (.codes).

Instead of using the default ‘dot-com’ (.com), the next generation of software developers, website builders and app designers are gravitating toward ‘dot-codes’ because it's one of hundreds of new options to the right of the dot in a URL. The next generation of coders are implementing it as a means of differentiating themselves from the websites of their 'dot-com' colleagues.

They’ve taken to it for its simplicity in defining their business. It’s the story of what they do in four letters. They code.

So, while nobody is in line for "The Fast and the Furious 8" yet, the demand for fast-and-furious programmers shows no signs of cooling off -- vroom, vroom -- and we're likely to see more 'dot-codes' websites as a result.

Here are just a few developers who've latched onto this new digital trend early on.

Sarah Federman sarah.codes

sarah_codes
sarah_codes

Sze Chan www.sze.codes

coding
coding

Nathan Tredgett nath.codes

nath_codes
nath_codes